Marykarinna

teachercreatedmaterials:

"I see you line up my world and my map…"

We love this! Mr. M and Mr. Parker explain the importance of Latitude and Longitude with the power of One Direction!

Also available on TeacherTube.

nativeamericannews:

5 Things Educators Should Know Before Teaching Native Culture and History
It’s summer, and teachers across Turtle Island will probably be thinking about their lesson plans for the coming school year soon. A question was recently posed to ICTMN wondering what teachers should know before approaching American Indian culture and history with their classrooms, so we started thinking about some basic answers.

nativeamericannews:

5 Things Educators Should Know Before Teaching Native Culture and History


It’s summer, and teachers across Turtle Island will probably be thinking about their lesson plans for the coming school year soon. A question was recently posed to ICTMN wondering what teachers should know before approaching American Indian culture and history with their classrooms, so we started thinking about some basic answers.


(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com)

historicaltimes:


Young women picketing outside White House gates for amnesty for war protesters. July 19 1922. Read More

historicaltimes:

Young women picketing outside White House gates for amnesty for war protesters. July 19 1922.

Read More

2014 Presidential Rankings: #1

deadpresidents:

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

16th President of the United States (1861-1865)

Full Name: Abraham Lincoln
Born: February 12, 1809, Hardin County (present-day LaRue County), Kentucky
Political Party: Republican
State Represented: Illinois
Term: March 4, 1861-April 15, 1865 (Assassinated)
Age at Inauguration:…

mashable:

The Structure Sensor 3D Scanner allows any iPad with a lightning connector to scan and import 3D images of rooms, objects, and people.

(Source: Mashable)

Celebrate Bill of Rights Day

usagov:

On December 15, 1791, the United States adopted the Bill of Rights, ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution written to guarantee essential rights and liberties omitted in the crafting of the original document. December 15th is Bill of Rights Day, an opportunity to reflect on these freedoms and the…

unhistorical:

[A] bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular, and what no just government should refuse.

- Thomas Jefferson, 1787.

December 15, 1791: The U.S. Bill of Rights goes into effect.

The first twelve amendments to the U.S. Constitution were introduced on September 25, 1789, and ten of them (collectively referred to as the Bill of Rights) were eventually ratified and went into effect on December 15, 1791. The basic rights granted in the Bill of Rights were based on or influenced heavily by the English Bill of Rights (1689), American Revolution ideals, and the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776). The latter was drafted by George Mason, who refused to sign the Constitution without the addition of amendments protecting the rights of individual Americans (in the context of the Bill of Rights, this included only white males and excluded minorities and women). 

Alexander Hamilton and other Federalists argued against the addition of a Bill of Rights; one of their arguments was that they feared that a stated list of rights would imply that rights left unstated would not be protected at all (a fear addressed in the Ninth Amendment). But desire for a bill of rights was felt almost universally, and among the Founding Fathers the most vocal support came from George Mason and Patrick Henry. Although James Madison authored the amendments, he was doubtful of the effectiveness of this “parchment barrier”. The Bill of Rights went into effect after its ratification by Virginia, although two proposed amendments were rejected by several states, one regarding apportionment and the other regarding congressional pay raises. Specifics regarding race or gender were not explicitly mentioned, but it was tacitly accepted that the provisions of the Bill of Rights did not extend to blacks (enslaved and free alike), women, Native Americans, and land-less white men. Firmly ingrained in the culture of the United States, its people, and its government, the Bill of Rights is currently located in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom alongside the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. 

usnatarchives:

Happy Constitution Day! The Constitution is 226 years old, and is the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is on permanent display at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You can see a high-res image and read a transcript of the Constitution here: http://go.usa.gov/D5VRTop Five Facts about the Constitution!Five: The Constitution has 4,543 words, including the signatures. It takes about 30 minutes to read.Four: Two of the first 12 amendments submitted were rejected; the remaining ten became the Bill of Rights.Three: The Chief Justice is mentioned in the Constitution, but the number of Justices is not specified.Two: Only one amendment to the Constitution has been repealed: the 18th (Prohibition).One: The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties, but it does guarantee them. For more Constitution myth busting, read today’s blog post: http://go.usa.gov/D5kJ

usnatarchives:

Happy Constitution Day! The Constitution is 226 years old, and is the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is on permanent display at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You can see a high-res image and read a transcript of the Constitution here: http://go.usa.gov/D5VR

Top Five Facts about the Constitution!

Five: The Constitution has 4,543 words, including the signatures. It takes about 30 minutes to read.

Four: Two of the first 12 amendments submitted were rejected; the remaining ten became the Bill of Rights.

Three: The Chief Justice is mentioned in the Constitution, but the number of Justices is not specified.

Two: Only one amendment to the Constitution has been repealed: the 18th (Prohibition).

One: The Constitution does not give us our rights and liberties, but it does guarantee them.

For more Constitution myth busting, read today’s blog post: http://go.usa.gov/D5kJ